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Take a Flying Leap with A Rogue Pioneer

The second installment of our “Get to Know a Rogue” Series gets to know Stacey Garrison-Weeks.


“Can I put on the costume?”

Stacey Garrison-Weeks’s five-year-old son Mason was pleading with her because he wanted to wear the Issaquah Brewhouse frog costume.

It was a few weeks ahead of the 8th annual Frogs & Dogs Festival and Stacey brought her son to the pub. She’d asked one of the bartenders at the Issaquah Brewhouse, where she is the manager, to dress up in the iconic frog costume to greet customers at the pub as a promotion for the event. The kid got his wish but only for a few minutes before Stacey decided it was time to go home.

That enthusiasm for Rogue and the Issaquah Brewhouse (where Rogue brews Frog Ales; hence the frog costume) is definitely something Stacey passed on to her son. She’s officially been a Rogue for 17 years but even before that, she had ties to Jack Joyce and the Oregon brewery.

Stacey Garrison with Rogue Ales & Spirits pub general manager, Tim Becker (center) and her son Mason (right).
Stacey Garrison with Rogue Ales & Spirits pub general manager, Tim Becker (center) and her son Mason (right).

Stacey grew up in Newport. “My dad ran the Port of Newport when Rogue moved the brewery there,” she explained. “He shared office space with Jack.”

By the time she was old enough to be a customer of Rogue’s, one of Stacey’s friends already worked at the pub. She ended up becoming a regular and before long, then-manager Amy Cline gave her a job.

“I started as a server,” she recalled. A year later, in 2000, Rogue bought the Issaquah Brewhouse in Issaquah, Washington. It would be the first Rogue Ales Meeting Hall to open after they moved the headquarters to Newport.

Stacey with another long-time Rogue and fellow pub manager, Russ Menegat.
Stacey with another long-time Rogue and fellow pub manager, Russ Menegat.

When she showed interest in moving, Jack sent Stacey to open the pub. He also made her the manager. Even while she was a bit intimidated by her new job as pub manager, she admitted, “Moving to Issaquah was a great experience. It was exciting to get out of Newport for a new challenge and start a new chapter in my life.”

Stacey fit right in and became a fixture in the community too. She attended Greater Issaquah Chamber of Commerce meetings regularly, got to know members of the city council and made friends with Fred Butler, who is now the mayor of Issaquah.

The Fire Room, dedicated to the local Issaquah Firefighters, at Issaquah Brewhouse.
The Fire Room, dedicated to the local Issaquah Firefighters, at Issaquah Brewhouse.

She even befriended the fire department, who use the pub as the location of their yearly vacation pick meeting. There’s a room in the pub today that’s dedicated to those firefighters.

Stacey’s poster for her Queen Sammamish campaign.
Stacey’s poster for her Queen Sammamish campaign.

Eventually, Stacey grew so popular in Issaquah that she was nominated to become the Sammamish Queen, an ambassador position with the Greater Issaquah Chamber. As part of her campaign, Rogue made posters for her, created a hopoe dedicated to her and designed a bottle with her on it. Rogue asked Issaquah to take a flying leap with Stacey and vote for her to be Queen.

While Stacey didn’t win the crown, she earned the honor of being named a “Princess” that year.

But Rogue not only considers Stacey a Queen in Issaquah, but she’s also one of the first Rogue pioneers, bringing the Rogue Nation over state lines to Washington.

“To be able to work for Rogue for 17 years and watch what we have become is truly amazing,” said Stacey. “To be truly Rogue, you have to be dedicated and love what you do.”