farms_6.4.19-dotcom-17

New Beer Ingredients Growing

We planted a few new things at Rogue Farms.

We're always growing beer and spirits at Rogue Farms in Independence, Oregon. Every year, we plant pumpkins that we'll use in our Pumpkin Patch Ale come autumn. But we're also in the process of planting new hop varieties on our 52 acre hop fields.


Rogue Innovation Brewer Michael King dropped by Rogue Farms in Independence, Oregon, where we grow ingredients for our World Class beers and spirits and helped us plant a new hop variety, a few seeds and checked up on the innovative ingredients growing in the Revolution Garden.

First, Michael checked in on the botanicals and experimental ingredients we grow in our Revolution Garden. It was here in this garden where we grew the rhubarb that inspired Rhubarb Schmubarb and the black currants that inspired Counter Currant.

Michael tests Angelica Stalk from the Revolution Garden while looking for brewing inspiration.
Michael tests Angelica Stalk from the Revolution Garden while looking for brewing inspiration.

Then Michael got his hands dirty, planting pumpkin seeds in the ground. We'll grow these seeds (as well as a few pumpkin starters that have been growing in our greenhouse) and harvest them when they're ready to brew Pumpkin Patch Ale.

Michael King takes handfuls of pumpkin seeds from a bucket to plant into the ground at Rogue Farms.
Michael King takes handfuls of pumpkin seeds from a bucket to plant into the ground at Rogue Farms.
The pumpkin seeds get tucked into the rich Willamette Valley soil.
The pumpkin seeds get tucked into the rich Willamette Valley soil.
The field required a bit of work prior to the seed planting.
The field required a bit of work prior to the seed planting.

Later, Michael had to opportunity to introduce a new hop rhizome to our 52 acre hop field.

Michael King holds a El Dorado hop rhizome, a new variety we planted at Rogue Farms.
Michael King holds a El Dorado hop rhizome, a new variety we planted at Rogue Farms.
The rhizome gets planted into the rich Willamette Valley soil.
The rhizome gets planted into the rich Willamette Valley soil.

Over the next year, we'll be ripping up nearly half of our hops to plant new varieties. It'll be two years before they yield anything and there's a chance they may not produce new hops at all but that's a risk we're willing to take to grow our own.

Click here to read this year's Rogue Farms Crop Report.