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How Cold Brew Coffee And Beer Are Alike

Two of our favorite things are coffee and beer. So why not enjoy both of them in same glass?

Which is how we came up with our latest collision Cold Brew IPA. It’s made with Cold Brew Coffee from Stumptown Coffee Roasters of Portland, Oregon, and an Oregon IPA we crafted at the Rogue Ales Brewery in Newport.

The idea isn’t as crazy as it sounds because cold brew coffee and beer have a lot in common.

1: BOTH ARE ROASTED

No one likes the flavor of green coffee. Green beans are soft, spongy and taste like grass.

But all that changes when the coffee is roasted. Roasting creates a variety of flavors ranging from a light cinnamon roast to a dark Italian or French.

Roasting the beans brings out the flavors and aroma we recognize when we think of coffee.
Roasting the beans brings out the flavors and aroma we recognize when we think of coffee.

Malted barley can be roasted too, and for the same reasons. The flavors created during roasting range from toast, to caramel, chocolate and black.

At Rogue Ales, we roast our malted barley in a second-hand coffee roaster. We can create any flavor of malt we want and invent new flavors from scratch.

Rogue Brewmaster John Maier roasting his own malted barley.
Rogue Brewmaster John Maier roasting his own malted barley.

2: BOTH ARE GROUND

Grinding the roasted beans releases the flavor and aroma compounds so they can be absorbed by water. The size of the grind depends on the brewing method.

The beans for cold brew coffee are ground coarse because they may spend as long as 24 hours in contact with water.
The beans for cold brew coffee are ground coarse because they may spend as long as 24 hours in contact with water.

Malted barley is milled, which is similar to grinding. Milling exposes the sugars and starches in the kernels and allows them to be absorbed by water.

Freshly milled barley at the Rogue Brewery. Barley at this stage is called grist.
Freshly milled barley at the Rogue Brewery. Barley at this stage is called grist.

3: BOTH LIKE IT COLD

Cold brew coffee is steeped at room temperature or in a refrigerator. That’s cold compared to the 200°F of hot brewed coffee.

Ice is optional.
Ice is optional.

Beer is boiled to create the mash, but fermented at cold temperatures ranging from 46°F to 58°F depending on the style and yeast.

John at work inside the Rogue Brewery in Newport, Oregon.
John at work inside the Rogue Brewery in Newport, Oregon.

BOTH CAN BE RECYCLED

Leftover coffee grounds can be composted or used as fertilizer in the garden.

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Rogue’s leftover (spent) barley is reused by Oregon dairy farmers and ranchers to feed their cows, goats, pigs and chickens.

Rogue’s spent barley is supplemental feed, used to improve livestock’s regular diet of grass and hay.
Rogue’s spent barley is supplemental feed, used to improve livestock’s regular diet of grass and hay.

BOTH ARE DELICIOUS

Stumptown Cold Brew Coffee on the bottling line. Photo courtesy of Stumptown Coffee Roasters.
Stumptown Cold Brew Coffee on the bottling line. Photo courtesy of Stumptown Coffee Roasters.
Rogue Ales Cold Brew IPA and Stumptown Coffee Roasters Cold Brew Coffee.
Rogue Ales Cold Brew IPA and Stumptown Coffee Roasters Cold Brew Coffee.

Rogue’s Cold Brew IPA is the perfect blend of what makes Oregon so great, beer crafted with Oregon grown hops and barley from Rogue Farms, and coffee roasted and cold brewed in Oregon at Stumptown Coffee Roasters.

To learn more and find out where to buy Cold Brew IPA, visit us at Rogue.com

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