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Hop Harvest is Here!

Hop Harvest is about to begin! Join Rogue Farms at the Hopyard for the journey from terroir to tap!


Within the next couple weeks, the Rogue Department of Agriculture will begin trimming, separating, sorting, kilning, cooling and baling each of their seven varieties of Rogue GYO Certified aroma hops.

Take a look at the photos below to see the process from start to finish. You can also check out our Hop Harvest video here to learn more, and visit rogue.com for updates on harvest dates and times.

The Rogue Farms Hopyard in Independence, Oregon where we grow and harvest our own.
The Rogue Farms Hopyard in Independence, Oregon where we grow and harvest our own.
1. Dry Matter Testing: Tells you when the cones are ready for harvesting. 20% dry matter is a really good number. Of course the old timers used to just pull apart the cones and smell them.
1. Dry Matter Testing: Tells you when the cones are ready for harvesting. 20% dry matter is a really good number. Of course the old timers used to just pull apart the cones and smell them.
2. Trimming: The harvest begins with cutting the bines just above the ground. Then large machines go through the hopyard and cut the bines from the wires. The loose bines fall into trucks and are brought to the processing area.
2. Trimming: The harvest begins with cutting the bines just above the ground. Then large machines go through the hopyard and cut the bines from the wires. The loose bines fall into trucks and are brought to the processing area.
3. Separating: Feed the bines into a giant raking machine that strips off the cones, leaves and stems. This machine is called the picker.
3. Separating: Feed the bines into a giant raking machine that strips off the cones, leaves and stems. This machine is called the picker.
4. Run everything through a series of conveyor belts, dribble belts and fans. Coming out on the other end will be nice, clean cones. This technology hasn’t changed since the 1980s.
4. Run everything through a series of conveyor belts, dribble belts and fans. Coming out on the other end will be nice, clean cones. This technology hasn’t changed since the 1980s.
5. Kilning: Big furnaces heat the hops to 145 degree F to 155 degree F to bring down moisture levels so the hops can be stored and shipped.
5. Kilning: Big furnaces heat the hops to 145 degree F to 155 degree F to bring down moisture levels so the hops can be stored and shipped.
6. Cooling: Hops sit around in big piles for 24 hours to cool down before they’re baled.
6. Cooling: Hops sit around in big piles for 24 hours to cool down before they’re baled.
7. Baling: The hops are pressed into 200lbs bales, wrapped in burlap and hand stitched.
7. Baling: The hops are pressed into 200lbs bales, wrapped in burlap and hand stitched.
8. The finished product. The Farmers and Fermenters of the Rogue Nation remain committed to saving the terroir of hops and barley one acre at a time by growing their own.
8. The finished product. The Farmers and Fermenters of the Rogue Nation remain committed to saving the terroir of hops and barley one acre at a time by growing their own.